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aiocron 0.7

Crontabs for asyncio

Usage

aiocron provide a decorator to run function at time:

>>> @aiocron.crontab('*/30 * * * *')
... @asyncio.coroutine
... def attime():
...     print('run')
>>> asyncio.get_event_loop().run_forever()

You can also use it as an object:

>>> @aiocron.crontab('1 9 * * 1-5', start=False)
... @asyncio.coroutine
... def attime():
...     print('run')
>>> attime.start()
>>> asyncio.get_event_loop().run_forever()

Your function still be available at attime.func

You can also yield from a crontab. In this case, your coroutine can accept arguments:

>>> @aiocron.crontab('0 9,10 * * * mon,fri', start=False)
... @asyncio.coroutine
... def attime(i):
...     print('run %i' % i)

>>> @asyncio.coroutine
... def once():
...     try:
...         res = yield from attime.next(1)
...     except Exception as e:
...         print('It failed (%r)' % e)
...     else:
...         print(res)
>>> asyncio.get_event_loop().run_forever()

Finally you can use it as a sleep coroutine. The following will wait until next hour:

>>> yield from crontab('0 * * * *').next()

If you don’t like the decorator magic you can set the function by yourself:

>>> cron = crontab('0 * * * *', func=yourcoroutine, start=False)

Notice that unlike standard unix crontab you can specify seconds at the 6th position.

aiocron use croniter. Refer to it’s documentation to know more about crontab format.

 
File Type Py Version Uploaded on Size
aiocron-0.7-py2.py3-none-any.whl (md5) Python Wheel py2.py3 2017-09-01 5KB
aiocron-0.7.tar.gz (md5) Source 2017-09-01 6KB