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as.recipe.filetemplate 2.2.2

zc.buildout recipe for creating files from file templates

Basic Usage

With the as.recipe.filetemplate buildout recipe you can automate the generation of text files from templates. Upon execution, the recipe will read a number of template files, perform variable substitution and write the result to the corresponding output files.

The recipe has several features, but it always takes template files with a .in suffix, processes the template, and writes out the file to the desired location with the same file mode, and the same name but without the .in suffix.

For example, consider this simple template for a text file:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... Hello ${world}!
... """)

Now let’s create a buildout configuration so that we can substitute the values in this file. All we have to do is define a part that uses the as.recipe.filetemplate recipe. With the files parameter we specify one or more files that need substitution (separated by whitespace). Then we can add arbitrary parameters to the section. Those will be used to fill the variables in the template:

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... world = Philipp
... """)

After executing buildout, we can see that ${world} has indeed been replaced by Philipp:

>>> print system(buildout)
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt')
Hello Philipp!

If you need to escape the ${…} pattern, you can do so by repeating the dollar sign.

>>> update_file(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... Hello world! The double $${dollar-sign} escapes!
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt')
Hello world! The double ${dollar-sign} escapes!

Note that dollar signs alone, without curly braces, are not parsed.

>>> update_file(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... $Hello $$world! $$$profit!
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt')
$Hello $$world! $$$profit!

Note that the output file uses the same permission bits as found on the input file.

>>> import stat
>>> import os
>>> input = os.path.join(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in')
>>> output = input[:-3]
>>> os.chmod(input, 0755)
>>> stat.S_IMODE(os.stat(input).st_mode) == 0755
True
>>> stat.S_IMODE(os.stat(output).st_mode) == 0755
False
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> stat.S_IMODE(os.stat(output).st_mode) == 0755
True

Source Folders and Globs

By default, the recipe looks for a .in file relative to the buildout root, and places it in the same folder relative to the buildout root. However, if you don’t want to clutter up the destination folder, you can add a prefix to the source folder. Here is an example.

First, we specify a source-directory in the buildout. You can specify files as a filter if desired, but by default it will find any file (ending with “.in”). You can also specify exclude-directories option if you want to exclude some paths from the source-directory search path.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... source-directory = template
... world = Philipp
... """)

Now we’ll make a “template” directory, as listed in the buildout configuration above, and populate it for our example.

>>> mkdir(sample_buildout, 'template')
>>> mkdir(sample_buildout, 'template', 'etc')
>>> mkdir(sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin')
>>> write(sample_buildout, 'template', 'etc', 'helloworld.conf.in',
... """
... Hello ${world} from the etc dir!
... """)
>>> write(sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin', 'helloworld.sh.in',
... """
... Hello ${world} from the bin dir!
... """)
>>> os.chmod(
...     os.path.join(
...         sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin', 'helloworld.sh.in'),
...     0711)

Notice that, before running buildout, the helloworld.txt file is still around, we don’t have an etc directory, and the bin directory doesn’t have our helloworld.sh.

>>> ls(sample_buildout)
-  .installed.cfg
d  bin
-  buildout.cfg
d  develop-eggs
d  eggs
-  helloworld.txt
-  helloworld.txt.in
d  parts
d  template
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
-  buildout

Now we install. The old “helloworld.txt” is gone, and we now see etc. Note that, for the destination, intermediate folders are created if they do not exist.

>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> ls(sample_buildout)
-  .installed.cfg
d  bin
-  buildout.cfg
d  develop-eggs
d  eggs
d  etc
-  helloworld.txt.in
d  parts
d  template

The files exist and have the content we expect.

>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
- buildout
- helloworld.sh
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'helloworld.sh')
Hello Philipp from the bin dir!
>>> stat.S_IMODE(os.stat(os.path.join(
...     sample_buildout, 'bin', 'helloworld.sh')).st_mode) == 0711
True
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'etc')
- helloworld.conf
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'etc', 'helloworld.conf')
Hello Philipp from the etc dir!

If you use the files option along with source-directory, it becomes a filter. Every target file must match at least one of the names in files. Therefore, if we only build .sh files, the etc directory will disappear.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... source-directory = template
... files = *.sh
... world = Philipp
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> ls(sample_buildout)
-  .installed.cfg
d  bin
-  buildout.cfg
d  develop-eggs
d  eggs
-  helloworld.txt.in
d  parts
d  template
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
- buildout
- helloworld.sh

Also note that, if you use a source directory and your files specify a directory, the directory must match precisely.

With the exclude-directories parameter, we specify one or more directories (separated by whitespace) in which the recipe will not look for template files. The exclude-directories option should be used along with the source-directory option. Therefore, if we set exclude-directories to bin, the bin/helloworld.sh file will disappear.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... source-directory = template
... exclude-directories = bin
... world = Philipp
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> ls(sample_buildout)
-  .installed.cfg
d  bin
-  buildout.cfg
d  develop-eggs
d  eggs
d  etc
-  helloworld.txt.in
d  parts
d  template
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'etc')
- helloworld.conf
>>> ls(sample_buildout, 'bin')
- buildout
>>> # Clean up for later test.
>>> import shutil
>>> shutil.rmtree(os.path.join(sample_buildout, 'template', 'etc'))
>>> os.remove(os.path.join(
...     sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin', 'helloworld.sh.in'))

Advanced Usage

Substituting from Other Sections

Substitutions can also come from other sections in the buildout, using the standard buildout syntax, but used in the template. Notice ${buildout:parts} in the template below.

>>> update_file(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... Hello ${world}.  I used these parts: ${buildout:parts}.
... """)
>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... world = Philipp
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt')
Hello Philipp.  I used these parts: message.

Path Extensions

Substitutions can have path suffixes using the POSIX “/” path separator. The template will convert these to the proper path separator for the current OS. They also then are part of the value passed to filters, the feature described next. Notice ${buildout:directory/foo/bar.txt} in the template below.

>>> update_file(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... Here's foo/bar.txt in the buildout:
... ${buildout:directory/foo/bar.txt}
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt') # doctest: +ELLIPSIS
Here's foo/bar.txt in the buildout:
/.../sample-buildout/foo/bar.txt

Filters

You can use pipes within a substitution to filter the original value. This recipe provides several filters for you to use. The syntax is reminiscent of (and inspired by) POSIX pipes and Django template filters. For example, if world = Philipp, HELLO ${world|upper}! would result in HELLO PHILIPP!.

A few simple Python string methods are exposed as filters right now:

  • capitalize: First letter in string is capitalized.
  • lower: All letters in string are lowercase.
  • title: First letter of each word in string is capitalized.
  • upper: All letters in string are uppercase.

Other filters are important for handling paths if buildout’s relative-paths option is true. See Working with Paths for more details.

  • path-repr: Converts the path to a Python expression for the path. If buildout’s relative-paths option is false, this will simply be a repr of the absolute path. If relative-paths is true, this will be a function call to convert a buildout-relative path to an absolute path; it requires that ${python-relative-path-setup} be included earlier in the template.
  • shell-path: Converts the path to a shell expression for the path. Only POSIX is supported at this time. If buildout’s relative-paths option is false, this will simply be the absolute path. If relative-paths is true, this will be an expression to convert a buildout-relative path to an absolute path; it requires that ${shell-relative-path-setup} be included earlier in the template.

Combining the three advanced features described so far, then, if the buildout relative-paths option were false, we were in a POSIX system, and the sample buildout were in the root of the system, the template expression ${buildout:bin-directory/data/initial.csv|path-repr} would result in '/sample-buildout/bin/data/initial.csv'.

Here’s a real, working example of the string method filters. We’ll have examples of the path filters in the Working with Paths section.

>>> update_file(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... HELLO ${world|upper}!
... hello ${world|lower}.
... ${name|title} and the Chocolate Factory
... ${sentence|capitalize}
... """)
>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... world = Philipp
... name = willy wonka
... sentence = that is a good book.
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt') # doctest: +ELLIPSIS
HELLO PHILIPP!
hello philipp.
Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory
That is a good book.

Sharing Variables

The recipe allows extending one or more sections, to decrease repetition, using the extends option. For instance, consider the following buildout.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [template_defaults]
... mygreeting = Hi
... myaudience = World
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... extends = template_defaults
...
... myaudience = everybody
... """)

The “message” section now has values extended from the “template_defaults” section, and overwritten locally. A template of ${mygreeting}, ${myaudience}!

>>> update_file(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... ${mygreeting}, ${myaudience}!
... """)

…would thus result in Hi, everybody!.

>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt')
Hi, everybody!

Defining options in Python

You can specify that certain variables should be interpreted as Python using interpreted-options. This takes zero or more lines. Each line should specify an option. It can define immediately (see silly-range in the example below) or point to an option to be interepreted, which can be useful if you want to define a multi-line expression (see first-interpreted-option and message-reversed-is-egassem).

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... interpreted-options = silly-range = repr(range(5))
...                       first-interpreted-option
...                       message-reversed-is-egassem
... first-interpreted-option =
...     options['interpreted-options'].splitlines()[0].strip()
... message-reversed-is-egassem=
...     ''.join(
...         reversed(
...             buildout['buildout']['parts']))
... not-interpreted=hello world
... """)
>>> update_file(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in', """\
... ${not-interpreted}!
... silly-range: ${silly-range}
... first-interpreted-option: ${first-interpreted-option}
... message-reversed-is-egassem: ${message-reversed-is-egassem}
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt') # doctest:+ELLIPSIS
hello world!
silly-range: [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
first-interpreted-option: silly-range = repr(range(5))
message-reversed-is-egassem: egassem

Working with Paths

We’ve already mentioned how to handle buildout’s relative-paths option in the discussion of filters. This section has some concrete examples and discussion of that. It also introduces how to get a set of paths from specifying dependencies.

Here are concrete examples of the path-repr and shell-path filters. We’ll show results when relative-paths is true and when it is false.

Demonstration of path-repr

Let’s say we want to make a custom Python script in the bin directory. It will print some information from a file in a data directory within the buildout root. Here’s the template.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin', 'dosomething.py.in', '''\
... #!${buildout:executable}
... ${python-relative-path-setup}
... f = open(${buildout:directory/data/info.csv|path-repr})
... print f.read()
... ''')
>>> os.chmod(
...     os.path.join(
...         sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin', 'dosomething.py.in'),
...     0711)

If we evaluate that template with relative-paths set to false, the results shouldn’t be too surprising.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... source-directory = template
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'dosomething.py') # doctest: +ELLIPSIS
#!...
<BLANKLINE>
f = open('/.../sample-buildout/data/info.csv')
print f.read()

${python-relative-path-setup} evaluated to an empty string. The path is absolute and quoted.

If we evaluate it with relative-paths set to true, the results are much… bigger.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
... relative-paths = true
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... source-directory = template
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'dosomething.py') # doctest: +ELLIPSIS
#!...
import os, imp
# Get path to this file.
if __name__ == '__main__':
    _z3c_recipe_filetemplate_filename = __file__
else:
    # If this is an imported module, we want the location of the .py
    # file, not the .pyc, because the .py file may have been symlinked.
    _z3c_recipe_filetemplate_filename = imp.find_module(__name__)[1]
# Get the full, non-symbolic-link directory for this file.
_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_base = os.path.dirname(
    os.path.abspath(os.path.realpath(_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_filename)))
# Ascend to buildout root.
_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_base = os.path.dirname(
    _z3c_recipe_filetemplate_base)
def _z3c_recipe_filetemplate_path_repr(path):
    "Return absolute version of buildout-relative path."
    return os.path.join(_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_base, path)
<BLANKLINE>
f = open(_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_path_repr('data/info.csv'))
print f.read()

That’s quite a bit of code. You might wonder why we don’t just use ‘..’ for parent directories. The reason is that we want our scripts to be usable from any place on the filesystem. If we used ‘..’ to construct paths relative to the generated file, then the paths would only work from certain directories.

So that’s how path-repr works. It can really come in handy if you want to support relative paths in buildout. Now let’s look at the shell-path filter.

Demonstration of shell-path

Maybe you want to write some shell scripts. The shell-path filter will help you support buildout relative-paths fairly painlessly.

Right now, only POSIX is supported with the shell-path filter, as mentioned before.

Usage is very similar to the path-repr filter. You need to include ${shell-relative-path-setup} before you use it, just as you include ${python-relative-path-setup} before using path-repr.

Let’s say we want to make a custom shell script in the bin directory. It will print some information from a file in a data directory within the buildout root. Here’s the template.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin', 'dosomething.sh.in', '''\
... #!/bin/sh
... ${shell-relative-path-setup}
... cat ${buildout:directory/data/info.csv|shell-path}
... ''')
>>> os.chmod(
...     os.path.join(
...         sample_buildout, 'template', 'bin', 'dosomething.sh.in'),
...     0711)

If relative-paths is set to false (the default), the results are simple.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... source-directory = template
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'dosomething.sh') # doctest: +ELLIPSIS
#!/bin/sh
<BLANKLINE>
cat /.../sample-buildout/data/info.csv

${shell-relative-path-setup} evaluated to an empty string. The path is absolute.

Now let’s look at the larger code when relative-paths is set to true.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
... relative-paths = true
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... source-directory = template
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'bin', 'dosomething.sh') # doctest: +ELLIPSIS
#!/bin/sh
# Get full, non-symbolic-link path to this file.
Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_FILENAME=`\
    readlink -f "$0" 2>/dev/null || \
    realpath "$0" 2>/dev/null || \
    type -P "$0" 2>/dev/null`
# Get directory of file.
Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE=`dirname ${Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_FILENAME}`
# Ascend to buildout root.
Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE=`dirname ${Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE}`
<BLANKLINE>
cat "$Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE"/data/info.csv

As with the Python code, we don’t just use ‘..’ for parent directories because we want our scripts to be usable from any place on the filesystem.

Getting Arbitrary Dependency Paths

You can specify eggs and extra-paths in the recipe. The mechanism is the same as the one provided by the zc.recipe.egg, so pertinent options such as find-links and index are available.

If you do, the paths for the dependencies will be calculated. They will be available as a list in the namespace of the interpreted options as paths. Also, three predefined options will be available in the recipe’s options for the template.

If paths are the paths, shell_path is the shell-path filter, and path_repr is the path-repr filter, then the pre-defined options would be defined roughly as given here:

os-paths (for shell scripts)
(os.pathsep).join(shell_path(path) for path in paths)
string-paths (for Python scripts)
',\n    '.join(path_repr(path) for path in paths)
space-paths (for shell scripts)
' '.join(shell_path(path) for path in paths)

Therefore, if you want to support the relative-paths option, you should include ${shell-relative-path-setup} (for os-paths and space-paths) or ${python-relative-path-setup} (for string-paths) as appropriate at the top of your template.

Let’s consider a simple example.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... eggs = demo<0.3
...
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... """ % dict(server=link_server))

The relative-paths option is false, the default.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt.in',
... """
... Hello!  Here are the paths for the ${eggs} eggs.
... OS paths:
... ${os-paths}
... ---
... String paths:
... ${string-paths}
... ---
... Space paths:
... ${space-paths}
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Getting distribution for 'demo<0.3'.
Got demo 0.2.
Getting distribution for 'demoneeded'.
Got demoneeded 1.2c1.
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt') # doctest:+ELLIPSIS
Hello!  Here are the paths for the demo<0.3 eggs.
OS paths:
/.../eggs/demo-0.2...egg:/.../eggs/demoneeded-1.2c1...egg
---
String paths:
'/.../eggs/demo-0.2...egg',
'/.../eggs/demoneeded-1.2c1...egg'
---
Space paths:
/.../eggs/demo-0.2...egg /.../eggs/demoneeded-1.2c1...egg

You can specify extra-paths as well, which will go at the end of the egg paths.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... eggs = demo<0.3
... extra-paths = ${buildout:directory}/foo
...
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt') # doctest:+ELLIPSIS
Hello!  Here are the paths for the demo<0.3 eggs.
OS paths:
/...demo...:/...demoneeded...:/.../sample-buildout/foo
---
String paths:
'/...demo...',
'/...demoneeded...',
'/.../sample-buildout/foo'
---
Space paths:
/...demo... /...demoneeded... .../sample-buildout/foo

To emphasize the effect of the relative-paths option, let’s see what it looks like when we set relative-paths to True.

>>> write(sample_buildout, 'buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = message
... relative-paths = true
...
... [message]
... recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
... files = helloworld.txt
... eggs = demo<0.3
... extra-paths = ${buildout:directory}/foo
...
... find-links = %(server)s
... index = %(server)s/index
... """ % dict(server=link_server))
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling message.
Installing message.
>>> cat(sample_buildout, 'helloworld.txt') # doctest:+ELLIPSIS
Hello!  Here are the paths for the demo<0.3 eggs.
OS paths:
"$Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE"/eggs/demo-0.2-py...egg:"$Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE"/eggs/demoneeded-1.2c1-py...egg:"$Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE"/foo
---
String paths:
_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_path_repr('eggs/demo-0.2-py...egg'),
_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_path_repr('eggs/demoneeded-1.2c1-py...egg'),
_z3c_recipe_filetemplate_path_repr('foo')
---
Space paths:
"$Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE"/eggs/demo-0.2-py...egg "$Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE"/eggs/demoneeded-1.2c1-py...egg "$Z3C_RECIPE_FILETEMPLATE_BASE"/foo

Remember, your script won’t really work unless you include ${shell-relative-path-setup} (for os-paths and space-paths) or ${python-relative-path-setup} (for string-paths) as appropriate at the top of your template.

Getting Dependency Paths from zc.recipe.egg

You can get the eggs and extra-paths from another section using zc.recipe.egg by using the extends option from the Sharing Variables section above. Then you can use the template options described above to build your paths in your templates.

Getting Dependency Paths from z3c.recipe.scripts

If, like the Launchpad project, you are using Gary Poster’s unreleased package z3c.recipe.scripts to generate your scripts, and you want to have your scripts use the same Python environment as generated by that recipe, you can just use the path-repr and shell-path filters with standard buildout directories. Here is an example buildout.cfg.

[buildout]
parts = scripts message
relative-paths = true

[scripts]
recipe = z3c.recipe.scripts
eggs = demo<0.3

[message]
recipe = as.recipe.filetemplate
files = helloworld.py

Then the template to use this would want to simply put ${scripts:parts-directory|path-repr} at the beginning of Python’s path.

You can do this for subprocesses with PYTHONPATH.

${python-relative-path-setup} import os import subprocess env = os.environ.copy() env[‘PYTHONPATH’] = ${scripts:parts-directory|path-repr} subprocess.call(‘myscript’, env=env)

That’s it.

Similarly, here’s an approach to making a script that will have the right environment. You want to put the parts directory of the z3c.recipe.scripts section in the sys.path before site.py is loaded. This is usually handled by z3c.recipe.scripts itself, but sometimes you may want to write Python scripts in your template for some reason.

#!/usr/bin/env python -S ${python-relative-path-setup} import sys sys.path.insert(0, ${scripts:parts-directory|path-repr}) import site # do stuff…

If you do this for many scripts, put this entire snippet in an option in the recipe and use this snippet as a single substitution in the top of your scripts.

Changes

2.2.0 (2011-09-01)

Features

  • Add support for excluding some subdirectories of the source-directory with the exclude-directories option. [Bruno Binet]

Fixes

  • Added undeclared but necessary test dependency on zope.testing in a test extra.
  • Added test dependency on z3c.recipe.scripts as it is required by newer zc.buildout versions.
  • Using python’s doctest module instead of deprecated zope.testing.doctest.

2.1.0 (2010-04-21)

Features

  • Enable cross-platform paths by allowing an extended syntax for path suffixes. Example: If ${buildout:directory} resolves to /sample_buildout on a POSIX system and C:\sample_buildout in Windows, ${buildout:directory/foo.txt} will resolve to /sample_buildout/foo.txt and C:\sample_buildout\foo.txt, respectively.
  • Add filters via a pipe syntax, reminiscent of UNIX pipes or Django template filters. Simple example: if ${name} resolves to harry then ${name|upper} resolves to HARRY. Simple string filters are upper, lower, title, and capitalize, just like the Python string methods. Also see the next bullet.
  • Added support for the buildout relative-paths option. Shell scripts should include ${shell-relative-path-setup} before commands with buildout-generated paths are executed. Python scripts should use ${python-relative-path-setup} similarly. ${os-paths} (shell), ${space-paths} (shell), and ${string-paths} (Python) will have relative paths if the buildout relative-paths option is used. To convert individual absolute paths to relative paths, use the path-repr filter in Python scripts and the shell-path filter in shell scripts. Path suffixes can be combined with these filters, so, if buildout’s relative-paths option is true, ${buildout:directory/foo.txt|path-repr} will produce a buildout-relative, platform appropriate path to foo.txt. Note that for shell scripts, Windows is not supported at this time.
  • Support escaping ${...} with $${...} in templates. This is particularly useful for UNIX shell scripts.

Fixes

  • Make tests less susceptible to timing errors.

Changes

  • ${os-paths} and ${space-paths} no longer filter out .zip paths.
  • The entries in ${string-paths} now are separated by newlines. Each entry is indented to the level of the initial placement of the marker.

2.0.3 (2009-07-02)

Fixes

  • Use realpath helper function from zc.buildout on the buildout directory too, such that it goes through the same normalization as the path being compared and stands a chance of working on Windows, due to possible drive letter case differences.

2.0.2 (2009-05-04)

Fixes

  • Turns out sorting paths was a bad idea. They are already in a deterministic order, AFAICT, because of the order or processing dependencies. Sorting them makes them less deterministic in practice, across machines.

2.0.1 (2009-04-30)

Fixes

  • Correct sdist generation to include all necessary files.
  • Doc formatting fixes.
  • Correct “Destinations already exist” message to list destinations without .in suffix.

2.0 (2009-04-30)

Features

  • Store your template files in a separate directory structure, using the source-directory option.
  • Specify multiple files automatically with globs.
  • Templates can reference other buildout sections using the usual syntax, e.g. ${buildout:parts}
  • Share options with other sections using the typical extends option.
  • Create destination directories automatically.
  • Define option values for templates dynamically in Python with the interpreted-options option.
  • Get paths for eggs by specifying eggs and extra-paths, just like zc.recipe.egg script recipe. These are available in template options in colon-delimited, space-delimited, and quoted variants. You can also build your own using the interpreted-options feature.
  • Templates are not processed if there are no changes to them or the buildout.

1.0 (2007-09-30)

Initial release.

 
File Type Py Version Uploaded on Size
as.recipe.filetemplate-2.2.2-py2.7.egg (md5) Python Egg 2.7 2013-05-03 26KB
as.recipe.filetemplate-2.2.2.tar.gz (md5) Source 2013-05-03 24KB