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collective.buildbot 0.4.1

A set of zc.buildout recipes and support for declarative configuration for Buildbot

Package description

This package provides a set of zc.buildout recipes that make it easy to configure a buildbot setup (build master, build slaves and projects) and a scripts to run the buildbot master and slaves. The recipes produce INI-style declarative configuration files based on the buildout configuration. These configuration files are in turn read by the buildbot runner script to initialize the buildbot environment.

The available recipes are:

  • collective.buildbot:master -- Produces a configuration file for the build master process.
  • collective.buildbot:slave -- Produces a configuration file for the build slave process.
  • collective.buildbot:project -- Produces a configuration for a project build on a selected slave.
  • collective.buildbot:poller -- Produces configuration for code repository pollers.

It is possible to use all the recipes in a single buildout and have both the master and slave(s) on the same machine. However, in most cases you will have one buildout for the build master that uses the collective.buildbot:master and collective.buildbot:project to set up the build processes and then separate buildouts on each of the slave machines that use the collective.buildbot:slave recipe.

Quick start

A paster template is provided with the package to generate a basic configuration. Just run:

$ easy_install -U collective.buildbot
$ paster create -t buildbot my.project
$ cd my.project

Check the generated configuration in master.cfg.

Build the environnement:

$ python bootstrap.py
$ ./bin/buildout

Then start the daemons:

$ ./bin/master start
$ ./bin/yourhostname start

Go to http://localhost:9080 and enjoy your new buildbot

The build master recipe

The collective.buildbot:master recipe produces a configuration file that sets up the build master process. Once the build master is configured you can run in by executing the controller script under the buildout's bin directory. The controller script will be named after the section name, so if you had a [buildmaster] section in your buildout.cfg you would get a bin/buildmaster script.

Supported options

The recipe supports the following options:

port
The port the build master process listens for connections from build slaves. The slaves must be configured to use the corresponding port in the sections using the collective.buildbot:slave recipe.
wport
The web port for serving the buildbot web interface.
project-name
Project name. Displayed on the web interface.
project-url
Project url, used on the web interface.
url
buildbot url.
build-slaves
A sequence of build slave configurations. Each build slave must be defined on a separate line containing the name of the build slave and the password for the build slave separated by white space.
allow-force (optional)
If true allows users to force builds using the web interface. Defaults to false.
public-html (optional)
Location of a directory that contains custom resources (HTML, CSS, images) for the web interface.
max-builds (optional)
Maximum number of parallel builds to run on each slave. Defaults to None (i.e. no limits).

Additionally you can use the following options if you need to run an IRC bot:

irc-host
The irc host to connect to. ie: irc.freenode.net
irc-channels
A list of channels to join, ie: #plone If channel has password write it after colon, ie. #private:passwd
irc-nickname
The bot nickname. Defaults to buildbot
irc-password
The password used to identify the bot. Defaults to an empty string

You can also use the following options if you need to run an PBListener:

listener-port
The port on which PBListener should listen for connections.
listener-user
Username used for connection authentication.
listener-passwd
Password used for connection authentication.

Example usage

We'll start by creating a buildout that uses the recipe:

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = buildmaster
...
... [buildmaster]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:master
... port = 8080
... wport = 8082
... project-name = The project
... project-url = http://example.com/
... url = http://example.com/buildbot
... slaves =
...     slave1 password
...     slave2 password
... """)

Running the buildout gives us:

>>> print system(buildout)
Installing buildmaster...
New python executable in /sample-buildout/parts/buildmaster/.../python...
Installing setuptools.............done.
Generated script '/sample-buildout/parts/buildmaster/buildbot.tac'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/buildmaster/buildbot.cfg'.
Generated script '/sample-buildout/bin/buildmaster'.

As shown above, the buildout generated the required configuration files and the runner script under bin. You can control build master process by running:

$ ./bin/buildmaster [start | stop | restart]

The Twisted .tac file that is used to launch the buildbot process:

>>> cat(join('parts', 'buildmaster', 'buildbot.tac'))
from twisted.application import service
from buildbot.master import BuildMaster
import os
import sys
import collective.buildbot
<BLANKLINE>
basedir = r'/sample-buildout/parts/buildmaster'
buildbot = os.path.dirname(collective.buildbot.__file__)
<BLANKLINE>
configfile = os.path.join(buildbot, 'master.py')
application = service.Application('buildmaster')
<BLANKLINE>
master = BuildMaster(basedir, configfile)
master.setServiceParent(application)
<BLANKLINE>

We can also see that the configuration file generated by the recipe reflects the options we chose in our buildout configuration:

>>> config_path  = os.path.join('parts', 'buildmaster', 'buildbot.cfg')
>>> config = ConfigParser()
>>> _ = config.read(config_path)
>>> slave_res = []
>>> for opt, val in (('slave1', 'password'),
...     ('slave2','password'),
... ):
...     slave_res.append(bool(val == config.get('slaves', opt)))
>>> False not in slave_res
True

>>> buildbot_res = []
>>> for opt, val in (('project-name','The project'),
...     ('projects-directory', '%s/parts/projects' % os.getcwd()),
...     ('pollers-directory', '%s/parts/pollers' % os.getcwd()),
...     ('wport', '8082'),
...     ('project-url', 'http://example.com/'),
...     ('port', '8080'),
...     ('allow-force', 'false'),
... ):
...     buildbot_res.append(bool(val == config.get('buildbot', opt)))
>>> False not in buildbot_res
True

The build slave recipe

The collective.buildbot:slave recipe produces a configuration file that sets up a build slave process. Once the build slave is configured you can run it by executing the controller script under the buildout's bin directory. The controller script will be named after the section name, so if you had a [buildslave] section in your buildout.cfg you would get a bin/buildslave script.

Since the name of the section using this recipe will also become the name of the build slave it is important to choose the name that corresponds to the buildmaster configuration.

Supported options

The recipe supports the following options:

host
Hostname of the build master.
port
Port that the build master is listening. This should match the port option in the section using the collective.buildbot:master recipe in your buildmaster buildout.
password
Build slave password. This should match the password in the slave-names section in the buildmaster buildout.
eggs
Used to install extra eggs in slave environment.
environment
Can define the name of a section, containing environment variable that will be defined in the slave environment.
executable
You can here specify a diffrent Python, with a different version that will be used to setup the virtualenv.
umask
Override the default 0077 umask which is used in the build directory.

Example usage

We'll start by creating a buildout that uses the recipe:

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts =
...    buildslave
...
... [buildslave]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:slave
... host = localhost
... port = 8888
... password = password
... environment = slaveenv
... umask = 0002
...
... [slaveenv]
... PATH = /bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/local/firefox
... """)

Running the buildout gives us:

>>> print system(buildout)
Installing buildslave.
...
Generated script /sample-buildout/parts/buildslave/buildbot.tac.
Generated script '/sample-buildout/bin/buildslave'.
<BLANKLINE>

As shown above, the buildout generated the required scripts. You can control build slave process by running:

$ ./bin/buildslave [start | stop | restart]

The project recipe

The collective.buildbot:project recipe is responsible for creating the buildbot configuration for a project which is a single testable component. Whether this project corresponds to a single sofware package or many is up to you. In most cases a project corresponds to a buildout which in turn may contain one or many software packages. Each project has a separate state and is visualized as a column in the waterfall display.

This recipe should be used in the same buildout with collective.buildbot:master.

Supported options

The recipe supports the following options:

slave-names (mandatory)

A white-space separated list of slave names that the project will be built on. These must correspond to the section names that use the collective.buildbot:slave recipe and that are consequently referred in the slaves option of the section using the collective.buildbot:master recipe.

vcs (optional)

The version control system used to obtain the source code for the project. Defaults to svn. Other possible values are: hg, bzr, git and cvs.

vcs-mode (optional)

The mode used to fetch the source code from the version control system. Defaults to update. Other possible values are: clobber, copy and export. See the buildbot manual section for Source Checkout for a description of what each option does.

repositories (mandatory)

A sequence of newline separated URLs to the code repositories that correspond to the selected version control system. For Subversion this could be something like https://svn.plone.org/svn/collective/collective.buildbot/trunk for Git something like git@github.com:dokai/hexagonit-swfheader.git and for CVS like :pserver:anonymous@cvs.sourceforge.net:/cvsroot/buildbot!buildbot.

For Subversion, if the url root is found in HOME/.buildout/.httpauth, username and password will be used to perform checkouts and updates. See: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/lovely.buildouthttp.

For each repository you define, a separate Buildbot project configuration will be generated that shares all the other options. This is useful if you have multiple similar projects within the same repository and can save you a lot of typing. Since Subversion URLs contain the branch information it is even possible to pull in code from separate branches. For other version control system that use the branch option (e.g. Git) you're limited to a single shared branch name.

branch (optional)

The branch in the version control system that will be checked out. For Subversion checkouts you should provide the full URL to the desired branch (e.g. something that ends with trunk or branches/foo) and leave this option empty. For Git repositories the default value is master. Note that for Git repositories you can use any identifier that resolves to (in the git rev-parse sense) to a treeish object.

always-use-latest (optional, defaults to False)

Whether to always update to the most recent available sources for this build. Please refer to the 'alwaysUseLatest' option of buildbot.steps.source.Source for more info.

Basically, if your buildbot is watching changes from multiple repositories it is very likely that you will need to set this option to True.

hg-branch-type (optional, defaults to inrepo)

If mercurial is used, define which branch type to use. By default it is inrepo. An another possible value is dirname.

email-notification-sender (optional)

An email address that will be used in the From: header for the notification messages.

email-notification-recipients (optional)

A newline separated sequence of email addresses the notification messages will be sent to.

mail-mode (optional)

The mode to use for sending mails. Available options are:

  • all

    Send mail about all builds, both passing and failing

  • failing

    Only send mail about builds which fail

  • problem

    Only send mail about a build which failed when the previous build has passed. If your builds usually pass, then this will only send mail when a problem occurs.

Defaults to:

failing

build-sequence (optional)

A newline separated sequence of shell commands executed on the build slave after checking out the code from the repository that will build the project.

Defaults to:

bin/python bootstrap.py
bin/buildout

which is appropriate for buildout based projects.

If a command starts with python, the command will be replaced with the full path to the python of the buildbot slave. The slave has its own virtualenv python

test-sequence (optional)

A newline separated sequence of shell commands executed on the build slave to execute the test suite. Defaults to:

bin/test

default-scheduler (optional)

Sets up the default scheduler that triggers a build after every change using a grace period waiting for more changes. The period can be specified in seconds.

periodic-scheduler (optional)

Sets up a periodic scheduler that schedules a build every n minutes, where n is the given integer value.

cron-scheduler (optional)

Sets up a cron-like scheduler that schedules a build at a given time. The time is configured in a crontab manner using white space separated values for the following fields:

[minute] [hour] [day of month] [month] [day of week]

The values should be either:

  • integers in the appropriate range for the given field,
  • a list of intergers in the format 2,4,6. Specified integers needs to be in the appropriate range for the given field,
  • */n where n is an integer which means every n integers in the appropriate range of the given field,
  • * (asterisk) for all possible values of the field.

For example to schedule a build at 3:00 am every night you would use:

cron-scheduler = 0 3 * * *

To schedule a build every 2 hours on the quarter of the time, you would use:

cron-scheduler = 15 */2 * * *

dependent-scheduler (optional)

Sets up a dependency between the given project and the current one. After a successful build of the given project, this one will be triggered.

dependencies (optional)

A sequence of newline-separated paths that when found on a change set should cause a build to be triggered on this slave.

For example, if you would like to cause your build to be run whenever a change to a project you depend on named some.other-project happens, you would use:

dependencies = some.other-project/trunk

The paths you list here are checked using substring matching. So for example, if you don't care which branch of some.other-project has changed, you could use:

dependencies = some.other-project

Or, alternatively, if you only care if a single file inside that project is changed, you could use a more specific path as well:

dependencies = some.other-project/trunk/versions.cfg

pyflakes (optional)

A sequence of newline separated PyFlakes commands to run. If defined, the given PyFlakes commands will be run after the test sequence.

The commands should consist of a path to the pyflakes script and a path to the source code container. For example, using a global pyflakes installation on a project located under src/some.project within the build directory you would set:

pyflakes = pyflakes src/some.project

You can also have your slave buildout install pyflakes and use that instead of a globally installed version.

Example usage

We'll start by creating a buildout that uses the recipe. A full example would propably have other sections defining the build master and slaves, but here we will demonstrate only the use of the collective.buildbot:project recipe.

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = my.package other.package
...
... [my.package]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:project
... email-notification-sender = email@example.com
... slave-names = slave1
... mail-host = localhost
... email-notification-recipients =
...         email@example.com
... vcs = svn
... vcs-mode = clobber
... repositories = http://example.com/svn/my.package/trunk
... always-use-latest = yes
...
... [other.package]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:project
... slave-names = slave1
... vcs = git
... branch = 3720f2e9b3a6a148b01843bc64fbea5af59df2af
... repositories = git://github.com/dokai/other.package.git
... dependencies = my.package/trunk
... """)

Running the buildout gives us:

>>> print system(buildout)
Installing my.package.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/my.package.cfg'.
Installing other.package.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/other.package.cfg'.

As we can see, the recipe generated the project configuration files under the projects directory in the parts:

>>> config_path  = os.path.join('parts', 'projects', 'my.package.cfg')
>>> config = ConfigParser()
>>> _ = config.read(config_path)
>>> res = []
>>> for opt, val in (('name', 'my.package'),
...     ('repository','http://example.com/svn/my.package/trunk'),
...     ('email-notification-sender', 'email@example.com'),
...     ('slave-names', 'slave1'),
...     ('mail-host', 'localhost'),
...     ('email-notification-recipients', '\nemail@example.com'),
...     ('vcs', 'svn'),
...     ('vcs-mode', 'clobber'),
...     ('always-use-latest', 'yes'),
... ):
...     res.append(bool(val == config.get('project', opt)))
>>> False not in res
True

>>> config_path  = os.path.join('parts', 'projects', 'other.package.cfg')
>>> config = ConfigParser()
>>> _ = config.read(config_path)
>>> res = []
>>> for opt, val in (('name', 'other.package'),
...     ('repository', 'git://github.com/dokai/other.package.git'),
...     ('slave-names', 'slave1'),
...     ('vcs', 'git'),
...     ('dependencies', 'my.package/trunk'),
...     ('branch', '3720f2e9b3a6a148b01843bc64fbea5af59df2af'),
... ):
...     res.append(bool(val == config.get('project', opt)))
>>> False not in res
True

If you have multiple similar projects you can define them within a single buildout section by providing multiple repository URLs. All the projects share the same options (except the repository URL). To further reduce repetition we've defined the base URL to our repository in the buildout section:

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = my_project
... svn = http://svn.example.com/svnroot
...
... [my_project]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:project
... slave-names = slave1
... vcs = svn
... repositories =
...    ${buildout:svn}/my.package/trunk
...    ${buildout:svn}/other.package/tags/1.2.3
...    ${buildout:svn}/third.package/branches/foobar
...    ${buildout:svn}/third.package/branches/another
...    ${buildout:svn}/third.package/branches/another
... """)

When we run the buildout we can see that it generated a separate configuration file for each project representing a single repository. A branch name is used as extra identifier if detectable, otherwise an integer is added:

>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling other.package.
Uninstalling my.package.
Installing my_project.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/my.package.cfg'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/other.package.cfg'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/third.package.cfg'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/third.package_another.cfg'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/third.package_2.cfg'.

The poller recipe

The poller recipe defines pollers that automatically query the code repositories for changes in project code base and then execute the builders if changes are found.

Supported options

The recipe supports the following options:

vcs

The version control system. Defaults to svn. Currently only Subversion repositories are supported.

repositories

A sequence of newline separated URLs to the root of the Subversion repository containing the project code. Note: This is the root URL to the repository and not the full path to your project. You only need to provide one URL per repository, not per project.

splitter

A regexp used to parse paths analyzed by the poller. The regexp must return 2 groups. The only important one is the project name to match in a builder repository.

Note that the regexp you provide will be treated as in raw-string format for you (e.g. this (?P<project>\S+\/foo|\S+\/bar\/[^\/]+)/(?P<relative>.*)) becomes r'(?P<project>\S+\/foo|\S+\/bar\/[^\/]+)/(?P<relative>.*))'

(Default '(?P<project>\S+\/trunk|\S+\/branches\/[^\/]+)/(?P<relative>.*)').

hist-max

Number of history lines to look at (Default 100).

user

A svn user (Default None).

password

A valid svn password for the user (Default None).

poll-interval

Interval in seconds to check for changes (Default 600).

svn-binary

Path to the svn binary. Defaults to svn which should work if you have in your PATH.

Example usage

We can define a poller to make our buildbot aware of commits:

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = svnpoller
...
... [svnpoller]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:poller
... repositories = http://example.com/svn
... user = h4x0r
... password = passwd
... """)

>>> print system(buildout)
Installing svnpoller.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/pollers/svnpoller.cfg'.

Poller generation. You can see here all the available options:

>>> config_path  = os.path.join('parts', 'pollers', 'svnpoller.cfg')
>>> config = ConfigParser()
>>> _ = config.read(config_path)
>>> res = []
>>> for opt, val in (('hist-max', '100'),
...     ('repository','http://example.com/svn'),
...     ('vcs','svn'),
...     ('user','h4x0r'),
...     ('svn-binary','svn'),
...     ('password','passwd'),
...     ('poll-interval','60')
... ):
...     res.append(bool(val == config.get('poller', opt)))
>>> False not in res
True

You can also have the poller to observe multiple repositories.

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts = svnpoller
...
... [svnpoller]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:poller
... repositories =
...     http://example.com/svn
...     http://otherexample.com/svn
...     http://other.server.com/svn
... user = h4x0r
... password = passwd
... """)
>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling svnpoller.
Installing svnpoller.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/pollers/svnpoller_0.cfg'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/pollers/svnpoller_1.cfg'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/pollers/svnpoller_2.cfg'.
<BLANKLINE>

Putting it all together

Below we will demonstrate how to put all the pieces together to create a buildbot environment for your own projects. We will use two separate buildouts: one for the build master and one for a single build slave. For your own projects you may choose to use multiple build slaves with each running, for example, on a different architecture or a different python version.

We'll start with the build master buildout that defines the build master process and all the projects that we wish to build and test. We also include a poller configuration that will poll the Subversion repository for changes the projects and execute the build when changes have occurred. If we were to use another version control system, such as Git, we would need to use a commit-hook or a time-based build scheduler.

We'll also use PyFlakes to perform additional checks on the source code.

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts =
...     buildmaster
...     svnpoller
...     my.project
...     my.buildout
...     another.package
...
... [buildmaster]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:master
... port = 8080
... wport = 8082
... project-name = The company buildout
... project-url = http://my.company.com
... url = http://buildbot.my.company.com
... allow-force = true
... public-html = ${buildout:directory}/buildbot_css
... slaves =
...     buildslave secretpassword
...
... [svnpoller]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:poller
... repositories =
...     ${my.project:svnroot}
...     ${my.buildout:svnroot}
... user = someuser
... password = anothersecret
...
... [my.project]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:project
... slave-names = slave1
... svnroot = https://svn.company.com/svn
... repositories = ${my.project:svnroot}/my.project/trunk
... email-notification-sender = buildbot@my.company.com
... email-notification-recipients =
...     my.project@my.company.com
...     dev@my.company.com
... mail-mode = problem
... mail-lookup = plone.org
... build-sequence =
... test-sequence = ../../bin/python setup.py test
...
... [my.buildout]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:project
... slave-names = slave1
... svnroot = https://svn.othercompany.com/svn
... repositories = ${my.buildout:svnroot}/my.buildout/trunk
... email-notification-sender = buildbot@my.company.com
... email-notification-recipients = dev@my.company.com
... test-sequence = bin/zope-instance test -v -vv
... pyflakes =
...     ../../../../bin/pyflakes src/collective.foo
...     ../../../../bin/pyflakes src/collective.bar
...
... [another.package]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:project
... slave-names = slave1
... vcs = git
... repositories = git://git.company.com/projects/another-package.git
... email-notification-sender = buildbot@my.company.com
... email-notification-recipients = dev@my.company.com
... build-sequence =
... test-sequence = ../../bin/python setup.py test
... periodic-scheduler = 60
... pyflakes = ../../../../bin/pyflakes .
... """)

We've allowed forced builds which is quite handy sometimes. Since the default buildbot web interface is not the most aesthetic we've also included a directory that contains our custom css.

The my.project and another.package packages are simple python packages so we use the setup.py script to run the test suites. Because these are simple packages we also clear out the build-sequence option since there is nothing to do before running the tests. The my.buildout section is your typical Zope buildout and uses the Zope controller script, zope-instance in this particular case, to run the tests.

Also, because the another.package project uses a Git repository, the SVN poller won't apply to it so we've set up a periodic scheduler that builds the project once in an hour. An alternative would be to install a post-commit hook to the Git repository that notifies the buildout of changes and schedules a build.

The my.buildout project is a buildout based project, so we can use the default build-sequence which will bootstrap and run the buildout for us. For the zope.testing test runner we pass the --exit-with-status parameter so that buildbot will know whether the tests failed or not. The trunk may have additional svn:externals defined that actually pull in the code that is tested which is the common place. We've also demonstrated using pyflakes on multiple source packages which may be the case in a full buildout.

Let's run the buildout now.

>>> mkdir('buildbot_css')
>>> print system(buildout)
Installing buildmaster...
New python executable in /sample-buildout/parts/buildmaster/.../python...
Installing setuptools............done.
Generated script '/sample-buildout/parts/buildmaster/buildbot.tac'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/buildmaster/buildbot.cfg'.
Generated script '/sample-buildout/bin/buildmaster'.
Installing my.project.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/my.project.cfg'.
Installing my.buildout.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/my.buildout.cfg'.
Installing svnpoller.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/pollers/svnpoller_0.cfg'.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/pollers/svnpoller_1.cfg'.
Installing another.package.
Generated config '/sample-buildout/parts/projects/another.package.cfg'.
<BLANKLINE>

As we can see we got the bin/buildmaster script to run the build master process and the corresponding configuration files. Our build master is now ready and you can start it by running:

$ ./bin/buildmaster start

Next, we create the buildout for the build slave. This buildout may be located on a different machine although having it on the same machine will work just as fine.

>>> write('buildout.cfg',
... """
... [buildout]
... parts =
...    buildslave
...    pyflakes
...
... [buildslave]
... recipe = collective.buildbot:slave
... host = buildbot.my.company.com
... port = 8080
... password = secretpassword
...
... [pyflakes]
... recipe = zc.recipe.egg
... eggs = pyflakes
... entry-points = pyflakes=pkg_resources:run_script
... arguments = 'pyflakes', 'pyflakes'
... """)

The slave buildout is very simple since the build master is in charge of everything and the slave simply needs to contact the master and receive instructions. We configured the address of the build master and the password to match the configuration in the build master buildout above.

We've also included PyFlakes in the slave buildout to assure that it is available on the slave machine. The pyflakes commands in the master buildout use a path referring to this version of pyflakes.

Running the buildout will give us the controller script for the slave and the pyflakes script:

>>> print system(buildout)
Uninstalling...
Installing buildslave...
New python executable in /sample-buildout/parts/buildslave/.../python...
Installing setuptools............done.
Generated script /sample-buildout/parts/buildslave/buildbot.tac.
Generated script '/sample-buildout/bin/buildslave'.
Installing pyflakes...
Generated script '/sample-buildout/bin/pyflakes'.
<BLANKLINE>

The build slave can be started by running:

$ ./bin/buildslave start

Once you have both the build master and slave running the poller should react to commits to the SVN repositories and run the builds after each change. You can view the buildbot status pages at the configured address, http://buildbot.my.company.com:8082/ in this case. You can use the web interface to force a build which can be useful to verify that the buildbot and projects are configured correctly.

It is now easy to add new projects or build slaves by modifying the buildout configurations and rerunning the buildouts.

Contributors

Project initiated at Ingeniweb (http://ingeniweb.com)

Initial Authors:
  • Gael Pasgrimaud
  • Tarek Ziade

Moved to the collective during the Plone Paris Sprint 2008.

Contributors:
  • Gael Pasgrimaud [gawel]
  • Tarek Ziade [tarek]
  • Kai Lautaportti [dokai]
  • Jean-Francois Roche
  • Mustapha Benali [mustapha]
  • Sylvain Viollon [thefunny]
  • Reinout van Rees [reinout]
  • Kevin Deldycke [kdeldycke]

Change history

0.4.1 (2010-04-13)

  • Add hg-branch-type option and support branch for Mercurial. [thefunny42]

0.4 (2010-02-19)

  • Set extended CSS as the default style. This was imported from brand new buildbot v0.7.12. [kdeldycke]
  • Projects are now sorted by ids. [thefunny42]
  • Slaves can use different python interpreter than the buildout does. You can define your interpretor with the executable option. [thefunny42]
  • Values like */4 or 8,12,16 are now supported as valid cron specifiers. [thefunny42]

0.3.7 (2010-01-24)

  • add num_events and num_events_max parameters. Thanks to Baiju M. [gawel]
  • buildbot requires the max_builds slave parameter to be an integer. [kdeldycke]

0.3.6 (2009-12-22)

  • Better fix for similar project names that occur in different buildout parts. For svn projects, this fixes that _trunk is appended unnecessarily and it allows the automatic projectname_branchname names to work again.
  • Setting "usepty" in the slave.tac to buildbot's new default of 0. See http://buildbot.net/trac/ticket/158 and especially http://buildbot.net/trac/ticket/255 . This fixes problems with simple shell commands like "cp" and "rm" failing for no apparent good reason. And the stdio output seems to react much quicker now: nice. [reinout]
  • Allow configuration updates to work again. [hannosch]
  • Add possibility to use the default scheduler that triggers a build after every change using a grace period waiting for more changes. [witsch]
  • When using svn and you test multiple branches of the same project, you now get project_branch-a, project_branch-b instead of project_2, project_3. Named after the branch/tag name. [reinout]
  • SVNScheduler changed the incoming change object in addChange to match to its internal structure. But the change is reused in the next project where it won't match any longer because of the change. [do3cc]
  • Offering two more mail features of buildbot for configuration in collective.buildbot mail-mode and mail-lookup. See updated collective.buildbot documentation [do3cc]
  • Fixed an issue with similar project names that appeared in different buildout parts [do3cc]
  • Fixed an issue with multiple repositories in a poller recipe [do3cc]

0.3.5 (2009-07-17)

  • buildbot 0.7.11 compatibility
  • various small fixes

0.3.4 (2009-05-21)

  • Remove useless imports in docs. [gawel]
  • Possible to configure PBListener [stxnext]
  • Added support for CVS repositories in project recipe. Location of code in CVS is described by cvsroot and cvsmodule. This two parameters are taken by spliting on ! sign on repository location. [stxnext]
  • IRC bot can join password protected channels. [stxnext]
  • Refactor of all doctests that demonstrate recipes that subclass BaseRecipe and rely upon it's write_config method. The implementation relies upon the ConfigParser module which utilizes a dictionary data structure for storage of sections and options. This can never be assumed to be ordered across Python versions and we really shouldn't care upon order in our implementation. Tests now verify existence within intended section and correct value, rather than placement. [andrewb]
  • Completing work from r67547 (e.g. Fixed occurrences of email-notification-recipients to the plural form). When initializing collective.buildbot.project.Project we want to actually look for the plural version. Additionally, we want our comment regarding notifications in master.cfg_tmpl to suggest the correct value to be set. [andrewb]
  • Make timeout configurable, globally and independently for build and test steps. [sidnei]
  • Strip always_use_latest option to avoid issues with whitespace. [sidnei]
  • Make Source Checkout retry up to 3 times, 10 seconds apart. Somehow later versions of buildbot seem to fail much more often when removing the checkout directory, and hopefully this will work around that. [sidnei]
  • Make Source Checkout mode configurable through vcs-mode. [sidnei]
  • Make build steps set haltOnFailure=True. No point in doing any testing if the build steps failed. [sidnei]
  • Fixed compatibility problem with buildbot 0.7.9 [dokai]
  • Fixed problem with the test suite initialization which resulted in all the doctests not being run. Also fixed test regressions that had surfaced undetected because of the problem. [dokai]

0.3.3 (2008-09-26)

  • Apply patch from Chris Shenton to override default umask [gawel]
  • Improve default template configuration [gawel]
  • Add clean css to template [gawel]

0.3.2 (2008-09-14)

  • Add paster template to quickly generate a basic configuration [gawel]
  • Fixed occurrences of email-notification-recipients to the singular form as used in most places. [hannosch]
  • Added a mechanism to have username/password for Subversion authentication Which consists of a buildbot patch and a link to .httpauth on buildout side [tarek]
  • Add dependency between projects. The build of one project can trigger the build of one other. [thefunny]
  • Improve the virtual env creation for Windows (mingw) and Cygwin. Installation of eggs works with mingw, and we should get a python ../../bin/python for Cygwin as well (symlink to the python used to run buildout). [thefunny]

0.3.1 (2008-05-31)

  • Fixed poller documentation and examples [mustapha]
  • Fixed failed tests when your executable is called something other than python, e.g python2.4 [mustapha]

0.3.0 (2008-05-28)

  • Use a custom scheduler to get poller working again [gawel]
  • Add splitter option to the poller recipe [gawel]
  • Added support for running PyFlakes on projects [dokai]
  • Refactored project name extraction logic [dokai]
    • Added Git support
    • Added support for defining multiple projects that result in duplicate project names (e.g. projects referring to different branches in a Subversion repository.)
  • Try to retrieve project name from svn urls [gawel]
  • Use a random minute in cron-scheduler when we have more than one repository [gawel]
  • Deactive virtualenv under cygwin, this doesn't work [thefunny]
  • 'environment' can be used to specify environment variable on slaves [thefunny]
  • 'eggs' can be used to install extra eggs in slaves [thefunny]
  • Refactored the functionality of the 'projects' recipe into the 'project' recipe and removed the 'projects' entry point. [dokai]
  • Refactored the functionality of the 'pollers' recipe into the 'poller' recipe and removed the 'pollers' entry point. [dokai]
  • Poller config files are now named after the section name, allowing multiple poller sections to be defined. [dokai]

0.2.1 (2008-05-21)

  • Fixed a critical typo in the slave name configuration in fullexample.txt [dokai]

0.2.0 (2008-05-21)

  • Added irc options so you can attach an irc bot to the master buildbot [mustapha]
  • Allow public_html customization [gawel]
  • Added custom about page to link to collective.buildout [gawel]
  • Added support for Git repositories [dokai]
  • Refactored the repository URL configuration. For Subversion, you should use only the repository option to specify a full URL to the desired branch (trunk, tag or branch) that will be built. For Git in addition to setting the repository option you can use the branch option to specify a specific branch to build. By default the master branch will be used for Git repositories. [dokai]
  • Cleaned up a lot of redundant imports. [dokai]
  • Updated the documentation and examples. [dokai]
  • Deprecated the collective.buildbot:projects recipe [dokai]
  • Fixed problem with missing twistd.log files on first run [dokai]
  • Fixed bug that prevented the master from starting if there weren't any SVN pollers configured. [dokai]
  • Added new options periodic-scheduler and cron-scheduler to set up passive schedulers for projects. [dokai]

0.1.1 (2008-05-02)

  • bugs fixes [gawel]

0.1.0 (xxxx-xx-xx)

  • Created recipe with ZopeSkel [Gael Pasgrimaud].
 
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