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csvmatch 1.12

Find (fuzzy) matches between two CSV files in the terminal.

CSV Match
=========

Find (fuzzy) matches between two CSV files in the terminal.

Part of a set of terminal-based CSV tools, also including [CSV Pivot](https://github.com/maxharlow/csvpivot) and [CSV Bar](https://github.com/maxharlow/csvbar)

Tested on Python 2.7 and 3.5.


Installing
----------

pip install csvmatch


Usage
-----

Say you have one CSV file such as:

```
name,location,codename
George Smiley,London,Beggerman
Percy Alleline,London,Tinker
Roy Bland,London,Soldier
Toby Esterhase,Vienna,Poorman
Peter Guillam,Brixton,none
Bill Haydon,London,Tailor
Oliver Lacon,London,none
Jim Prideaux,Slovakia,none
Connie Sachs,Oxford,none
```

And another such as:

```
Person Name,Location
Maria Andreyevna Ostrakova,Russia
Otto Leipzig,Estonia
George SMILEY,London
Peter Guillam,Brixton
Konny Saks,Oxford
Saul Enderby,London
Sam Collins,Vietnam
Tony Esterhase,Vienna
Claus Kretzschmar,Hamburg
```

You can then find which names are in both files:

```bash
$ csvmatch data1.csv data2.csv \
--fields1 name \
--fields2 'Person Name'
```

You can also compare multiple columns, so if we wanted to find which name and location combinations are in both files we could:

```bash
$ csvmatch data1.csv data2.csv \
--fields1 name location \
--fields2 'Person Name' Location
```

By default, all columns are used to compare rows. Specific columns can be also be given to be compared -- these should be in the same order for both files. Column headers with a space should be enclosed in quotes. Matches are case-sensitive by default, but can be made case-insensitive with `-i`.

There are also options to ignore non-alphanumeric characters (`-a`), to convert to the latin alphabet (`-n`), and to sort words (`-s`) before comparisons. Specific terms can also be filtered out before comparisons by passing a text file and the `-l` argument. A predefined list of common English name prefixes (Mr, Ms, etc) can be used with `-t`.

By default the columns used in the output are the same ones used for matching. Other sets of columns can be specified using the `--output` parameter. This takes a space-separated list of column names, each prefixed with a number and a dot indicating which file that field is from:

```bash
$ csvmatch data1.csv data2.csv \
--fields1 name location \
--fields2 'Person Name' Location \
--output 1.name '2.Person Name' 2.Location \
> results.csv
```

There are also some special column definitions. `1*` and `2*` expand into all columns from that file. Where a fuzzy matching algorithm has been used `degree` will add a column with a number between 0 - 1 indicating the strength of each match.

By default the two files are linked using an inner join -- only successful matches are returned. However using `-f` you can specify a `left-outer` join which will return everything from the first file, whether there was a match or not. You can also specify `right-outer` to do the same but for the second file, and `full-outer` to return everything from both files.

We can combine some of the above options to perform operations alike Excel's `VLOOKUP`. So if we wanted to add a column to `data2.csv` giving the codename of each person that is specified in `data1.csv`:

```bash
$ csvmatch data1.csv data2.csv \
--fields1 name \
--fields2 'Person Name' \
--join right-outer \
--output 2* 1.codename \
> results.csv
```

### Fuzzy matching

CSV Match also supports fuzzy matching. This can be combined with any of the above options.

#### Bilenko

The default fuzzy mode makes use of the [Dedupe library](https://github.com/dedupeio/dedupe) built by Forest Gregg and Derek Eder based on the work of Mikhail Bilenko. This algorithm asks you to give a number of examples of records from each dataset that are the same -- this information is extrapolated to link the rest of the dataset.

```bash
$ csvmatch data1.csv data2.csv --fuzzy
```

The more examples you give it, the better the results will be. At minimum, you should try to provide 10 positive matches and 10 negative matches.

#### Levenshtein

[Damerau-Levenshtein](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damerau–Levenshtein_distance) is a string distance metric, which counts the number of changes that would have to be made to transform one string into another.

For two strings to be considered a match, we require 60% of the longer string to be the same as the shorter one.

```bash
$ csvmatch data1.csv data2.csv --fuzzy levenshtein

name,name
George Smiley,George SMILEY
Toby Esterhase,Tony Esterhase
Peter Guillam,Peter Guillam
```

Here this matches Toby Esterhase and Tony Esterhase -- Levenshtein is good at picking up typos and other small differences in spelling.

#### Metaphone

[Double Metaphone](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metaphone#Double_Metaphone) is a phonetic matching algorithm, which compares strings based on how they are pronounced:

```bash
$ csvmatch data1.csv data2.csv --fuzzy metaphone

name,name
George Smiley,George SMILEY
Peter Guillam,Peter Guillam
Connie Sachs,Konny Saks
```

This shows a match for Connie Sachs and Konny Saks, despite their very different spellings.


A note on uniqueness
--------------------

Both with exact matches and fuzzy matching a name being the same is [no guarantee](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most_popular_given_names) it refers to the same person. But the inverse is also true -- even with CSV Match, a combination of first inital and last name is likely to be sufficiently different from forename, middle names, and surname together that a match is unlikely. Moreso if one name includes a typo, either accidential or deliberate.  
File Type Py Version Uploaded on Size
csvmatch-1.12-py2.py3-none-any.whl (md5) Python Wheel 2.7 2017-04-28 12KB
csvmatch-1.12.tar.gz (md5) Source 2017-04-28 8KB