skip to navigation
skip to content

decorator-args 1.1

Optional/required/keyword-only decorator arguments made easy.

This mini-library is far from being revolutionary or essential but its features may come in handy for some. It is a chaotic set of ideas and features that I don’t really feel to be rock solid but I think it isn’t an unforgivable guilt to release it to the wild. In worst case you can open a “Please destruct this code/library” issue on its github page.

Installation

pip install decorator-args

Alternatively you can download the distribution from the following places:

Usage

Problem to solve

The following code snippet shows two examples:

  1. Applying a decorator called argless without any arguments.
  2. Applying a decorator called argful that receives arguments before applying it.
#1
@argless
def decorated_function():
    ...

#2
@argful('arg1_value', arg2='arg2_value')
def decorated_function():
    ...

This library tries to make it easier to implement decorators that receive arguments (like argful_decorator above). Besides this it has some related extra features to offer (optional and keyword-only decorator args).

How this library helps

The previously used argful decorator can be implemented in countless ways but the two most standard ways to do it without this library looks like this:

  1. “Inception-style” implementation as a function:
def argful(arg1, arg2='arg2_default'):
    # TODO: Validate and pre-process decorator args as early as possible for easier debugging
    def decorate(decoratable):
        @functools.wraps(decoratable)
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            # TODO: Manipulate the input and output of the wrapped
            # decoratable object and use arg1 and arg2 if you want...
            return decoratable(*args, **kwargs)
        return wrapper
    return decorate
  1. Implementation as a class:
class argful(object):
    def __init__(self, arg1, arg2='arg2_default'):
        # TODO: Validate and pre-process decorator args as early as possible for easier debugging
        self.arg1 = arg1
        self.arg2 = arg2

    def __call__(self, decoratable):
        @functools.wraps(decoratable)
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs)
            # TODO: Manipulate the input and output of the wrapped
            # decoratable object and use self.arg1 and self.arg2 if you want...
            return decoratable(*args, **kwargs)
        return wrapper

The decorator_args.decorator_args decorator provided by this library can remove a level of indirection from the “Inception-style” implementation seen in example #1 making the code simpler and more readable:

from decorator_args import decorator_args


@decorator_args
def argful(decoratable, arg1, arg2='arg2_default'):
    @functools.wraps(decoratable)
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        # TODO: Manipulate the input and output of the wrapped
        # decoratable object and use arg1 and arg2 if you want...
        return decoratable(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper

At the same time this library offers the following extra features:

  • It can force keyword-only argument passing for your decorator. In some cases this is desirable because it can make code easier to read and understand:
# Decorator implementation with keyword-only decorator arguments:
@decorator_args(keyword_only=True)
def argful(decoratable, arg1, arg2='arg2_default'):
    ...


# This would fail with a ``TypeError('This decorator receives only keyword arguments')``
@argful('arg1_value', arg2='arg2_value')
def decorated_function():
    ...


# This is OK because all args are passed as keyword args
@argful(arg1='arg1_value', arg2='arg2_value')
def decorated_function():
    ...
  • If your decorator doesn’t have required arguments and you use the optional feature of this library than you can apply your decorator without an argument list when you don’t want to pass any args to it:
# Decorator implementation with optional argument list:
# Note that our decorator doesn't have required args other than the decoratable object:
@decorator_args(optional=True)
def argful(decoratable, arg1='arg1_default', arg2='arg2_default'):
    ...


# This works because of using `optional=True` above:
@argful
def decorated_function():
    ...


# This would work even without `optional=True` in our decorator implementation:
@argful()
def decorated_function():
    ...


# Of course passing actual args also works as expected:
@argful('arg1_value', 'arg2_value')
def decorated_function():
    ...

Library interface

The library offers a decorator_args.decorator_args decorator that is the main “workhorse” of the library and a set of other decorators that are just convenience helpers around the previously mentioned main decorator. Syntax-wise the arguments of these decorators are optional and keyword-only.

Main “entrypoint”

decorator_args.decorator_args(*, keyword_only=False, optional=False, is_decoratable_object=None)

The main decorator of the library. All other decorators are just convenience helpers based on this one.

  • keyword_only: Makes the arguments of your decorator keyword-only. Passing any positional arguments to your decorator will result in a TypeError with an appropriate error message.

  • optional: optional=True allows you to write @your_decorator instead of @your_decorator(). When you apply your decorator without passing any args to it you can omit the empty brackets that specify the empty decorator argument list.

  • is_decoratable_object: This argument can be used only when keyword_only=False and optional=True. When the argument list of your decorator is optional and you apply your decorator by passing only a single positional argument to the decorator this library has hard time to decide whether that single positional argument is an optional decorator argument or a decoratable object. This decision is made by the library function decorator_args.default_is_decoratable_object(obj) function which returns True if the given single positional argument is a function, method, or class. This default behavior is good in most of the cases when your decorator receives only simple arguments like integers, strings, bools, etc… However if your decorator can receive a single positional argument that can be a function, method, or class, then the default behavior isn’t suitable. There are several workarounds to this problem, one of them is providing your own is_decoratable_object(obj) implementation through the currently documented decorator argument. You probably have additional info to make an accurate distinction between decorator arguments and decoratable objects to provide a working is_decoratable_object(obj) implementation.

    In such pathological edge-cases you can also use the following workarounds besides the previously documented custom is_decoratable_object(obj) implementation:

    • When you apply your decorator with only a single argument that is a function/method/class you can pass the argument as a keyword-argument. This way it will be detected as a decorator argument for sure. This is however just a dirty hack that still leaves chance for the users of your decorator to make an error. This can result in long debugging sessions.
    • You can make your optional arguments keyword-only with keyword_only=True. This completely eliminates the problem.
    • Don’t make the argument list of this decorator optional. With a required decorator argument list this problem isn’t present.

Helpers: convenience API

The convenience API provides a set of decorators that are just “wrappers” around the main decorator_args.decorator_args decorator. These convenience decorators just bind some of the main decorator arguments to some constants.

decorator_args.optional_decorator_args(*, keyword_only=False, is_decoratable_object=None)

Works just like the main decorator_args.decorator_args decorator with optional=True.

decorator_args.keyword_only_decorator_args(*, optional=False)

Works just like the main decorator_args.decorator_args decorator with keyword_only=True.

decorator_args.optional_keyword_only_decorator_args()

Works just like the main decorator_args.decorator_args decorator with optional=True and keyword_only=True.

Implementing your decorators in a “twisted” way

The tricky implementation of the library ensures that the decorators provided by this library can be applied to your decorators even in some exotic cases:

When your decorator is a bound instance/class/static method

class AnyClass(object):
    @decorator_args
    def decorator_when_bound(self, decoratable, arg1, arg2):
        ...

    # It is important to apply @decorator_args after @classmethod!
    @decorator_args
    @classmethod
    def decorator_when_bound_2(cls, decoratable, arg1, arg2):
        ...

    # It is important to apply @decorator_args after @statimethod!
    @decorator_args
    @staticmethod
    def decorator_when_bound_3(decoratable, arg1, arg2):
        ...


any_class_instance = AnyClass()

decorator_with_args = any_class_instance.decorator_when_bound
decorator_with_args_2 = AnyClass.decorator_when_bound_2
decorator_with_args_3a = any_class_instance.decorator_when_bound_3
decorator_with_args_3b = AnyClass.decorator_when_bound_3

When your decorator is a bound __call__ magic (instance)method

class AnyClass(object):
    @decorator_args
    def __call__(self, decoratable, arg1, arg2):
        ...


# Because of the syntactic sugar provided by python it is as simple as:
decorator_with_args = AnyClass()
 
File Type Py Version Uploaded on Size
decorator-args-1.1.tar.gz (md5) Source 2016-04-14 8KB
decorator_args-1.1-py2.py3-none-any.whl (md5) Python Wheel py2.py3 2016-04-14 3KB