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django-simple-sso 0.11

Simple SSO for Django

django-simple-sso
=================

The latest version of this package supports:

* Django >= 1.7


#######################################
Django Simple SSO Specification (DRAFT)
#######################################

***********
Terminology
***********

Server
======

The server is a Django website that holds all the user information and
authenticates users.

Client
======

The client is a Django website that provides login via SSO using the **Server**.
It does not hold any user information.

Key
===

A unique key identifying a **Client**. This key can be made public.

Secret
======

A secret key shared between the **Server** and a single **Client**. This secret
should never be shared with anyone other than the **Server** and **Client** and
must not be transferred unencrypted.

********
Workflow
********


#. User wants to log into a **Client** by clicking a "Login" button. The
initially requested URL can be passed using the ``next`` GET parameter.
#. The **Client**'s Python code does a HTTP request to the **Server** to request a
authentication token, this is called the **Request Token Request**.
#. The **Server** returns a **Request Token**.
#. The **Client** redirects the User to a view on the **Server** using the
**Request Token**, this is the **Authorization Request**.
#. If the user is not logged in the the **Server**, they are prompted to log in.
#. The user is redirected to the **Client** including the **Request Token** and a
**Auth Token**, this is the ``Authentication Request``.
#. The **Client**'s Python code does a HTTP request to the **Server** to verify the
**Auth Token**, this is called the **Auth Token Verification Request**.
#. If the **Auth Token** is valid, the **Server** returns a serialized Django User
object.
#. The **Client** logs the user in using the Django User recieved from the **Server**.


********
Requests
********

General
=======

All requests have a ``signature`` and ``key`` parameter, see **Security**.

Request Token Request
=====================

* Client: Python
* Target: **Server**
* Method: GET
* Extra Parameters: None
* Responses:

* ``200``: Everything went fine, the body of the response is a url encoded
query string containing with the ``request_token`` key holding the
**Request Token** as well as the ``signature``.
* ``400``: Bad request (missing GET parameters)
* ``403``: Forbidden (invalid signature)


Authorization Request
=====================

* Client: Browser (User)
* Target: **Server**
* Method: GET
* Extra Parameters:

* ``request_token``

* Responses:

* ``200``: Everything okay, prompt user to log in or continue.
* ``400``: Bad request (missing GET parameter).
* ``403``: Forbidden (invalid **Request Token**).


Authentication Request
======================

* Client: Browser (User)
* Target: **Client**
* Method: GET
* Extra Parameters:

* ``request_token``: The **Request Token** returned by the
**Request Token Request**.
* ``auth_token``: The **Auth Token** generated by the **Authorization Request**.

* Responses:

* ``200``: Everything went fine, the user is now logged in.
* ``400``: Bad request (missing GET parameters).
* ``403``: Forbidden (invalid **Request Token**).


Auth Token Verification Request
===============================

* Client: Python
* Target: **Server**
* Method: GET
* Extra Parameters:

* ``auth_token``: The **Auth Token** obtained by the **Authentication Request**.

* Responses:

* ``200``: Everything went fine, the body of the response is a url encoded
query string containing the ``user`` key which is the JSON serialized
representation of the Django user to create as well as the ``signature``.


********
Security
********

Every request is signed using HMAC-SHA256. The signature is in the ``signature``
parameter. The signature message is the urlencoded, alphabetically ordered
query string. The signature key is the **Secret** of the **Client**. To verify
the signature the ``key`` paramater holding the **key** of the **Client** is
also sent with every request from the **Client** to the **Server**.

Example
=======

GET Request with the GET parameters ``key=bundle123`` and the private key
``secret key``: ``fbf6396d0fc40d563e2be3c861f7eb5a1b821b76c2ac943d40a7a63b288619a9``


***************
The User object
***************

The User object returned by a successful **Auth Token Verification Request**
does not contain all the information about the Django User, in particular, it
does not contain the password.

The user object contains must contain at least the following data:

* ``username``: The unique username of this user.
* ``email``: The email of this user.
* ``first_name``: The first name of this user, this field is required, but may
be empty.
* ``last_name``: The last name of this user, this field is required, but may
be empty.
* ``is_staff``: Can this user access the Django admin on the **Client**?
* ``is_superuser``: Does this user have superuser access to the **Client**?
* ``is_active``: Is the user active?


**************
Implementation
**************

On the server
=============

* Add ``simple_sso.sso_server`` to ``INSTALLED_APPS``.
* Create an instance (potentially of a subclass) of
``simple_sso.sso_server.server.Server`` and include the return value of the
``get_urls`` method on that instance into your url patterns.


On the client
=============

* Create a new instance of ``simple_sso.sso_server.models.Consumer`` on the
**Server**.
* Add the ``SIMPLE_SSO_SECRET`` and ``SIMPLE_SSO_KEY`` settings as provided by
the **Server**'s ``simple_sso.sso_server.models.Client`` model.
* Add the ``SIMPLE_SSO_SERVER`` setting which is the absolute URL pointing to
the root where the ``simple_sso.sso_server.urls`` where include on the
**Server**.
* Add the ``simple_sso.sso_client.urls`` patterns somewhere on the client.
 
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django-simple-sso-0.11.tar.gz (md5) Source 2017-03-01 12KB