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gonzo 0.3.0

Instance and release management made easy

Instance and release management made easy

Manage instances running in Amazon Web Services or using Openstack using a single consistent interface:

$ gonzo instance-launch production-web-app
...
$ gonzo list

production-web-app-001        m1.large   ACTIVE   david    0d 0h  2m 23s
fullstack-database-006        m1.small   ACTIVE   fergus   7d 23h 45m 3s
staging-jenkins-slave-003     m1.large   ACTIVE   matthew  60d 4h 18m 40s

Easily target instances or groups of instances with fab commands and manage your code deployments using included fabric tasks:

$ fab gonzo.group:production-ecommerce-web push_release rollforward

Configuration

Setup your clouds

Command Line Interface

Having setup multiple cloud environments and/or regions within, use the gonzo config command to chose where you want to deploy servers or projects to:

$ gonzo config
cloud: None
region: None
$ gonzo config --cloud aws
cloud: aws
region: eu-west-1
$ gonzo config --region us-west-1
cloud: aws
region: us-west-1

Managing the instance lifecycle

Having chosen the cloud and region you want to work within you can issue gonzo commands to control the spinning up, monitoring and termination of instances within.

To see a list of all running instance in the region:

$ gonzo list
production-sql-004          m1.small   ACTIVE   david    20d 20h 4m 23s
production-web-004          m1.small   ACTIVE   fergus   7d 23h 45m 3s

To add a new instance to the region, specifying the server type - having defined server types, and their sizes in your config:

$ gonzo instance-launch production-web

To get more info on the commands available:

$ gonzo --help

Using gonzo with fabric

You can then use gonzo to set a target server (or group of servers) for fabric commands.

Import gonzo in your fabfile to extend fab with gonzo functionality:

$ cat fabfile.py

from gonzo.tasks import gonzo
__all__ = ['gonzo']

You can then run a command on a single instance, specifying it through gonzo:

$ fab gonzo.instance:production-web-003 run_command

Or run the command on a group of instances:

$ fab gonzo.group:production-web run_command

Fabric task library

To use the gonzo library of fabric tasks, simply import the relevant task modules for namespaced tasks into your fabfile:

from gonzo.tasks import apache

These can then be called using the standard fabric syntax:

$ fab gonzo.group:production-web apache.restart

Alternatively import the tasks directly:

from gonzo.tasks.apache import restart

These commands won't be namespaced:

$ fab gonzo.group:production-web restart

You can extend the functionality by patching your own commands into the gonzo namespaces to provide a clean CLI:

# ~/apache_maintenance_mode.py
from fabric.api import task, sudo
from gonzo.tasks import apache

def maintenance_mode(off=False):
    """ Set server into maintenance mode.
    """

    if off:
        sudo("a2ensite onefinestay && a2dissite 00maintenance")
    else:
        sudo("a2ensite 00maintenance && a2dissite onefinestay")

apache.maintenance_mode = task(maintenance_mode)

Using Gonzo With CloudInit

CloudInit can be used to personalise the instances you launch. The user data scripts passed to new instances for CloudInit to process can be specified for each cloud by using the DEFAULT_USER_DATA config item in config.py:

CLOUDS = {
    'cloudname': {

        ...
        'DEFAULT_USER_DATA': 'http://example.com/my-cloudinit-config.txt',
        ...

Additionally, user data scripts can be specified per instance by using the launch argument --user-data <file | url>:

# gonzo instance-launch --user-data ~/.gonzo/cloudinit_web_app production-web-app

User data scripts can be specified as a file path or URL.

Before user data scripts are passed to new instances, they're first rendered as a template, allowing them to be parameterised. By default a few are already available, such as hostname, domain and fqdn. These can be supplemented by defining a USER_DATA_PARAMS cloud config dictionary:

CLOUDS = {
    'cloudname': {

        ...
        'DEFAULT_USER_DATA': 'http://example.com/my-cloudinit-config.txt',
        'USER_DATA_PARAMS': {
            'puppet_address': 'puppetmaster.example.com',
        }
        ...

Again, these parameters can also be supplemented or overridden at launch time by using the command line argument --user-data-params key=val[,key=val..]:

# gonzo instance-launch --user-data ~/.gonzo/cloudinit_web_app \
    --user-data-params puppet_address=puppetmaster2.example.com \
    production-web-app

Launching CloudFormation Stacks with Gonzo

Gonzo can be used to launch stacks to CloudFormation compatible APIs. Stacks can be launched, listed, shown (for individual detail) and terminated. Launching a stack is as simple as:

# gonzo stack-launch website-stack

This would launch a stack named website-stack-001 (or with another unique incrementing numeric suffix). The stack's template URI is looked up from the ORCHESTRATION_TEMPLATE_URIS config dictionary declared within your cloud's config scope. The template used would be identified by website-stack or, failing that, default:

CLOUDS = {
    'cloudname': {

        ...
        'ORCHESTRATION_TEMPLATE_URIS': {
            'default': '~/gonzo/cfn_default',
            'website-stack: 'https://example.com/cfn/website-stack.json',
            # ^ This one would be used ^
        },
        ...

The template URI can also be overridden on the command line with the --template-uri option. Template URIs can be a local file path or a resolvable web request.

Once resolved, templates are parsed as Jinja2 templates. Some variables such as stackname, domain and fqdn are provided by default but these can be supplemented or overridden by a config supplied dictionary and then a command line argument. Command line provided key-values always override others. For example, with the following config values defined:

CLOUDS = {
    'cloudname': {

        ...
        'ORCHESTRATION_TEMPLATE_URIS': {
            'default': '~/gonzo/cfn_default',
            'website-stack: 'https://example.com/cfn/website-stack.json',
        },
        'ORCHESTRATION_TEMPLATE_PARAMS': {
            'puppetmaster': 'puppetmaster.example.com',
            'db_server': 'db.example.com',
        },
        ...

        'DNS_ZONE': 'example.com',

the command:

# gonzo stack-launch \
    --template-params db_server=db-secondary.example.com \
    website-stack

would result in a stack being launched from a template fetched from https://example.com/cfn/website-stack.json. The template would be parameterised by the dictionary:

{
    'stackname': 'website-stack-001',
    'domain': 'example.com',
    'fqdn': 'website-stack-001.example.com',
    'puppetmaster': 'puppetmaster.example.com',
    'db_server': 'db-secondary.example.com',
}

and the stack would be labelled with a unique name prefixed with website-stack.

TODO

  • project based stuff
    • project name [for /srv/project_name] (git setting?)
    • Document how to use for release control

Build status

https://secure.travis-ci.org/onefinestay/gonzo.png?branch=master

License

Apache 2.0 - see LICENSE for details

 
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