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importanize 0.6.0

Utility for organizing Python imports using PEP8 or custom rules

Latest Version: 0.6.1

Utility for organizing Python imports using PEP8 or custom rules

Installing

You can install importanize using pip:

$ pip install importanize

Why?

I think imports are important in Python. I also think PEP8 is awesome (if you disagree, read some PHP) and there are many tools to help developers reformat code to match PEP8. There are however fewer tools for organizing imports either by following PEP8 or custom rules. There is isort (which unfortunately I found out about after writing this lib) however it seems to do lots of magic to determine which packages are 3rd party, local packages, etc. I wanted the imports configuration to be simple and explicit. This is where importanize comes in. It allows to organize Python imports using PEP8 or your custom rules. Read on for more information.

Using

Using importanize is super easy. Just run:

$ importanize file_to_organize.py

That will re-format all imports in the given file. As part of the default configuration, importanize will try it’s best to organize imports to follow PEP8 however that is a rather challenging task, since it is difficult to determine all import groups as suggested by PEP8:

  1. standard library imports
  2. related third party imports
  3. local application/library specific imports

To help importanize distinguish between different import groups in most cases it would be recommended to use custom config file:

$ importanize file_to_organize.py config.json

Config file is simply a json file like this:

{
    "formatter": "grouped",
    "groups": [
        {
            "type": "stdlib"
        },
        {
            "type": "sitepackages"
        },
        {
            "type": "remainder"
        },
        {
            "type": "packages",
            "packages": [
                "my_favorite_package"
            ]
        },
        {
            "type": "local"
        }
    ]
}

Default config looks something like:

{
    "groups": [
        {
            "type": "stdlib"
        },
        {
            "type": "sitepackages"
        },
        {
            "type": "remainder"
        },
        {
            "type": "local"
        }
    ]
}

Currently the only required key is "groups" which must be an array of group definitions. importanize will use these group definitions to organize imports and will output import groups in the same order as defined in the config file. These are the supported group types:

  • stdlib - standard library imports including __future__

  • sitepackages - imports coming from the site-packages directory

  • local - local imports which start with ".". for example from .foo import bar

  • packages - if this group is specified, additional key packages is required within import group definition which should list all Python packages (root level) which should be included in that group:

    {
        "type": "packages",
        "packages": ["foo", "bar"]
    }
    
  • remaining - all remaining imports which did not satisfy requirements of all other groups will go to this group.

You can use the config file by specifying it in the importanize command as shown above however you can also create an .importanizerc file and commit that to your repository. As a matter of fact, you can see the .importanizerc config file used for the importanize repository itself. Additionally multiple configurations are supported within a single repository via sub-configurations. Simply place .importanizerc within a sub-folder and all imports will be reconfigured under that folder.

You can also choose the formatter used to organize long multiline imports. Currently, there are two formatters available:

  • grouped (default)
  • inline-grouped

It can be set using the formatter config value, or the formatter option, for example:

$ importanize --formatter=inline-group --print tests/test_data/input.txt

Finally, you can see all other available importanize cli options:

$ importanize --help

Not all configurations can be provided via cli. Additional available configurations in configuration file:

  • exclude - list of glob patterns of files which should be excluded from organizing. For example:

    "exclude": [
        "path/to/file",
        "path/to/files/ignore_*.py"
    ]
    
  • after_imports_new_lines - number of lines to be included after imports

  • add_imports - list of imports to add to every file. For example:

    "add_imports": [
        "from __future__ import absolute_import, print_function, unicode_literals"
    ]
    

Example

Here is a before and after using the default formatter(on hypothetical file):

Before

from __future__ import unicode_literals, print_function
import os.path as ospath
import datetime
from package.subpackage.module.submodule import CONSTANT, Klass, foo, bar, rainbows
from .module import foo, bar
from ..othermodule import rainbows

After

from __future__ import print_function, unicode_literals
import datetime
from os import path as ospath

from package.subpackage.module.submodule import (
    CONSTANT,
    Klass,
    bar,
    foo,
    rainbows,
)

from ..othermodule import rainbows
from .module import bar, foo

Here is what importanize did:

  • alphabetical sort, even inside import line (look at __future__)
  • normalized import .. as .. into from .. import .. as ..
  • broke long import (>80 chars) which has more than one import into multiple lines
  • reordered some imports (e.g. local imports .. should be before .)

Testing

To run the tests you need to install testing requirements first:

$ make install

Then to run tests, you can use nosetests or simply use Makefile command:

$ nosetests -sv
# or
$ make test

History

0.6.0 (2017-10-06)

  • Added support for sub-configurations when .importanize is found.
  • Added support for add_imports in configuration.

0.5.3 (2017-06-06)

  • Added support to customize number of new lines added after imports via after_imports_new_lines configuration. Useful when using auto formatters such as yapf.

0.5.2 (2017-05-18)

  • Skipping directories which makes skipping subfolders much faster
  • Fixed bug which incorrectly skipped files

0.5.1 (2017-05-09)

  • Fixed bug which incorrectly removed duplicate leafless imports which had different as names

0.5.0 (2017-05-03)

  • Added --ci flag to validate import organization in files
  • Added sitepackages import group. Thanks Pamela. See README for more info
  • Added pipe handling (e.g. cat foo.py | importanize)
  • Fixed bug which incorrectly sorted imports with aliases (e.g. import foo as bar)
  • Files are not overridden when imports are already organized. Useful in precommit hooks which detect changed files.
  • Released as Python wheel

0.4.1 (2015-07-28)

  • Fixed a bug where importanize did not correctly detect stdlibs on Windows (see #29)
  • Removed future dependency since six>=1.9 includes all the used features
  • Fixed tests to be executable on Windows

0.4 (2015-04-13)

  • Added multiple formatter options. Can be used using --formatter flag or can be set in the configuration file.
  • Fixes a bug in parsing imports when encountering both \ and () (see #26 for example)
  • Fixes a bug where wildcard leaf imports were combined with other others (see #25 for example)

0.3 (2015-01-18)

  • Using tokens to parse Python files. As a result this allows to fix how comments are handled (see #21 for example)

0.2 (2014-10-30)

  • New “exclude” config which allows to skip files
  • Presetving origin file new line characters
  • Traversing parent paths to find importanize config file

0.1.4 (2014-10-12)

  • Multiple imports (e.g. import a, b) are normalized instead of exiting
  • Multiple imports with the same stem are combined into single import statement (see #17 for example)

0.1.3 (2014-09-15)

  • Fixed where single line triple-quote docstrings would cause none of the imports to be recognized

0.1.2 (2014-09-15)

  • Fixed where import leafs were not properly sorted for mixed case (aka CamelCase)

0.1.1 (2014-09-07)

  • Ignoring comment blocks when parsing for imports
  • Fixed bug when imports start on a first line, extra lines were being added to the file.

0.1.0 (2014-09-07)

  • First release on PyPI.

Credits

Development Lead

Contributors

License

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2014, Miroslav Shubernetskiy

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

 
File Type Py Version Uploaded on Size
importanize-0.6.0-py2.py3-none-any.whl (md5) Python Wheel 3.6 2017-10-06 32KB
importanize-0.6.0-py3-none-any.whl (md5) Python Wheel 3.6 2017-10-06 32KB
importanize-0.6.0.tar.gz (md5) Source 2017-10-06 18KB