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wdocker 0.2.0

Define docker commands in your Dockerfile

wdocker

Github | BitBucket | PyPI | Travis-CI

wdocker is a simple little solution to manage your docker image(s) and container(s) without having to remember and type long lists of optional arguments to docker commands. There are far more sophisticated soultions for managing Docker container environments like Decking or Docker compose and I advise to use them for setting up environments of multiple containers.

Reasons for using this docker wrapper called wdocker may be:

  • it does not need an (extra) configfile
  • it does not make any assumptions about your docker environment
  • it is very flexible and scriptable

Dependencies

Installing

Installing (from the Python Package Index):

sudo pip install --upgrade wdocker

Installing (development version):

git clone git://github.com/babab/wdocker.git
cd wdocker
sudo make install

Un-installing:

pip uninstall wdocker

Writing commands in your Dockerfile

When wdocker runs, it parses the Dockerfile in the current directory and tries to find variables and commands. These are both defined by using a ‘special’ comment, that begins with #wd#.

Defining a variable:

#wd# <var> = <value>

Defining a command (commands are very much like shell aliases):

#wd# <command>: <shell command>

Expanding a variable in another variable or command:

#wd# somevar = {variable}
#wd# somecommand: {variable}

Dockerfile examples

You must define your own commands and it don’t even have to be docker commands, so you can get as creative as you would like.

A very basic Dockerfile might look like this:

#wd# name = example_basic
#wd# build: docker build -t {name} .
#wd# run: docker run -it --name {name} {name}

FROM debian:latest
CMD watch ps aux

It is perfectly possible to combine variables and commands, like in this example:

# wdocker vars:

#wd# docker = docker
#wd# name = combined
#wd# build = {docker} build -t {name} .
#wd# run = {docker} run -it --name {name} {name}

# wdocker commands:

#wd# build: {build}
#wd# run: {run}
#wd# up: {build} && {run}

FROM debian:latest
CMD watch ps aux

Using wdocker to run commands

It you just run wdocker without any arguments, it will show a usage message with the possible commands that you have defined in you Dockerfile with the variables expanded. This can be used to review any command before actually executing it.

To also show variables and internal commands, run wdocker with either -h, -help or --help.

The usage message for the last Dockerfile example looks like this:

Usage: wdocker [<command> | -help]

Commands:
  build     docker build -t combined .
  run       docker run -it --name combined combined
  up        docker build -t combined . && docker run -it --name combined combined

And the full message with wdocker -help looks like this:

Usage: wdocker [<command> | -help]

Internal commands:
  -help, -h, --help      show full usage info and vars
  -version               show version info
  -print-var <variable>  print value of <variable>

Variables:
  docker    = docker
  name      = combined
  build     = docker build -t combined .
  run       = docker run -it --name combined combined

Commands:
  build     docker build -t combined .
  run       docker run -it --name combined combined
  up        docker build -t combined . && docker run -it --name combined combined

This means you can proceed to execute either wdocker build, wdocker run or wdocker up.

Running tests

Testing is done with nose. To install nose and run tests in a Python virtualenv for example, do the following (pyvenv is available since Python 3.3):

pyvenv .virtualenv
source .virtualenv/bin/activate
pip install -r requirements-dev.txt
nosetests -v

Tests are run automatically for each commit and/or pull request by Travis-CI.

Bugs, Issues and Enhancements

Feel free to use the issues, forking and/or pull requests mechanisms of Github or Bitbucket to submit bugs, ideas or enhancements.

License

wdocker is released under an ISC license, which is functionally equivalent to the simplified BSD and MIT/Expat licenses, with language that was deemed unnecessary by the Berne convention removed.


Copyright (c) 2015 Benjamin Althues <benjamin@babab.nl>

Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software for any purpose with or without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice and this permission notice appear in all copies.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS” AND THE AUTHOR DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, DIRECT, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.

Change Log

All notable changes to wdocker will be documented here. The project adheres to Semantic Versioning.

0.2.0 - 2015-10-02

Added

  • This CHANGELOG
  • Internal command -version for displaying version information
  • Support for full shell commands like docker foo exec ip addr | grep 172

Fixed

  • Internal commands not displaying with -help when there is no Dockerfile
  • Handle error when variable is called but not defined

0.1.0 - 2015-09-26

Added

  • Initial release
 
File Type Py Version Uploaded on Size
wdocker-0.2.0-py2.py3-none-any.whl (md5) Python Wheel any 2015-10-02 10KB
wdocker-0.2.0.tar.gz (md5) Source 2015-10-02 6KB