skip to navigation
skip to content

yaprt 0.4.4

Repository builder for python source code

General Overview

Yaprt is a tool built to turn Python source code into a python wheels. While that not all that remarkable yaprt goes a bit further. The idea behind yaprt is to allow deployers to maintain lots of diverse projects in different repositories and turn source code into distributable python packages with minimal effort while maintaining dependencies and requirements across the various projects without finding duplicate packages and disjointed versions in what should be a stable deployment.

Yaprt has lots of functionality though has a simple cli interface. For everything yaprt can do please review yaprt --help. Additionally all of the sub-commands have more information regarding options that are unique to the individual sub-command. These options can be viewed via yaprt sub-command --help.

Example Usage

The commands listed regarding the functionality of yaprt assume that you will have the following directory structure created within your host.

mkdir -p /var/www/repos/             ## Main repo directory
mkdir -p /var/www/repos/os-releases  ## Location where symlinked wheels will exist
mkdir -p /var/www/repos/pools        ## Location where wheels will exist
mkdir -p /var/www/repos/reports/     ## Location where report files will exist
mkdir -p /var/www/repos/repos-file   ## Location where requirement files will exist

In the basic example I’m going to assume that you have some repo_file.txt on your system and it has a bunch of git repos within it. In my example I will be creating a report targeting OpenStack services and clients for the latest stable/juno and will create all of the python wheels for use in my local index.

cat > /var/www/repos/repos-file/openstack-repos-file.txt<<EOF
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-tuskarclient@0.1.8
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-ceilometerclient@1.0.9
git+https://github.com/openstack/oslo.middleware@0.4.0
git+https://github.com/openstack/neutron@2014.2.2
git+https://github.com/openstack/oslo.messaging@1.4.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-heatclient@0.2.12
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-keystoneclient@1.0.0
git+https://github.com/openstack/glance_store@0.1.10
git+https://github.com/openstack/tempest@3
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-swiftclient@2.3.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-openstackclient@1.0.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-cinderclient@1.1.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/cinder@2014.2.2
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-saharaclient@0.7.6
git+https://github.com/openstack/heat@2014.2.2#egg=extraroute&subdirectory=contrib/extraroute
git+https://github.com/openstack/tempest@master
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-novaclient@2.20.0
git+https://github.com/openstack/horizon@2014.2.2
git+https://github.com/openstack/swift@2.2.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-ironicclient@0.2.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/keystonemiddleware@1.3.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-neutronclient@2.3.10
git+https://github.com/openstack/glance@2014.2.2
git+https://github.com/openstack/heat@2014.2.2
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-troveclient@1.0.8
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-barbicanclient@2.2.1
git+https://github.com/openstack/requirements@stable/juno
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-zaqarclient@0.1.0
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-designateclient@1.0.3
git+https://github.com/openstack/keystone@2014.2.2
git+https://github.com/openstack/python-glanceclient@0.15.0
git+https://github.com/openstack/nova@2014.2.2
EOF

With this basic requirements file ready we feed that file into yaprt using the create-report sub-command which will kick out a JSON report file. The report file will list all of the discovered requirements and pip install URLs for the items I listed in the requirements file.

yaprt create-report \
      --report-file /var/www/repos/reports/release-stable-juno-report.json \
      --git-install-repos-file /var/www/repos/repos-file/openstack-repos-file.txt

Now that the report file /var/www/repos/reports/release-stable-juno-report.json is ready its time to tell yaprt to build all of the python bits into python wheels.

Applying patches to a sources

Yaprt can also use ref spec commits from things like gerrit and can chain multiple commits to gether to create a single patched branch. To do this you’d create an entry within the repo_file.txt or on the command line that looks like this:

git+https://review.openstack.org/openstack/neutron@refs/changes/59/177159/12,refs/changes/11/187011/3,refs/changes/66/180466/2

This entry will base all commits at the point in time of the first refs change with the other comma delimited changes as a cherry-pick on top. This will create a single “patched” branch which will be noted within the repo build report as items that have been patched via yaprt. Be aware that when doing multiple patches one on-top of one another the pick strategy is to always use the first commit in the list as the base with everything else picked on top of it. This is done using the following git pick process git cherry-pick -x FETCH_HEAD. If there is an error in picking the commits, the process will halt resulting in log output regarding what’s broken and why.

Telling yaprt to ignore requirement indexing

Yaprt can be told to ignore requirement indexing by simply adding the yaprtignorerequirements=true fragment to the online URL for the repo.

git+https://github.com/openstack/tempest@352082ec9a6847727aa3eb79d3a8d9008cea54d4#yaprtignorerequirements=true

While this will build the wheel for the given package it will not index and enforce the package requirements onto the rest of the items being built.

Building the wheels

First we tell yaprt to resolve the requirements by themselves. Yaprt uses a solver for all of the known requirements such that it will make sure that there are no conflicting dependencies for all of the items being built within the given report. This is especially useful when dealing with multiple projects that implement independent requirements that may be disjointed from one another and have limited information on specifically what items are absolutely required and which are not.

yaprt build-wheels \
      --report-file "/var/www/repos/reports/release-stable-juno-report.json" \
      --storage-pool "/var/www/repos/pools" \
      --link-dir "/var/www/repos/os-releases/juno" \
      --pip-bulk-operation \
      --build-output "/tmp/openstack-wheel-output" \
      --build-dir "/tmp/openstack-builder" \
      --build-requirements

At the completion of this command you will have a release requirements txt file that can be used with pip elsewhere if the full build was ever to need to be reproduced in a different location. This plain requirements file will be located at /var/www/repos/os-releases/juno/build_reqs.txt

With the requirements built we move on to building the main services. Notice in the next command we are not building the using a bulk operation and have instructed yaprt to not build the dependencies. The reason that we’re not building the dependencies in this part is because we’ve already done it with the previous command.

At the completion of this command we will have a loaded PyPi index which will be available here: /var/www/repos/pools. Additionally we will have a link directory at /var/www/repos/os-releases/juno which contains symlinks pointing back to the python wheels that are now stored in our pools directory. This structure allows you to point pip at your new PyPi repository or your links directory which will further allow you to install pre-built python wheels within your environment based on source code that you just specified in your /var/www/repos/repos-file/openstack-repos-file.txt file. This creates a stable release of Python wheels that can be used to ensure consistency within a deployment for its lifetime.

yaprt build-wheels \
      --report-file "/var/www/repos/reports/release-stable-juno-report.json" \
      --storage-pool "/var/www/repos/pools" \
      --link-dir "/var/www/repos/os-releases/juno" \
      --pip-no-deps \
      --build-output "/tmp/openstack-wheel-output" \
      --build-dir "/tmp/openstack-builder" \
      --build-branches \
      --build-releases

If you are only building the wheels for a local system you can stop here. However, if you are building these wheels on a remote system and your hosting the index via some web server you can run one more yaprt command to create html indexes of all the files found within your repo structure.

yaprt --quiet \
      create-html-indexes \
      --repo-dir "/var/www/repos"

Now your done.

For more information on how to setup pip to simply use your frozen repository of wheels or our PyPi index please have a look at the pip.conf.example file within this repository for ideas on how that can be done as well as review the online documentation on regarding setting up and using pip configuration files (https://pip.pypa.io/en/latest/user_guide.html#configuration).

 
File Type Py Version Uploaded on Size
yaprt-0.4.4.tar.gz (md5) Source 2015-10-23 28KB